Ceiling Fans for Angled Ceilings

Ceiling Fans for Angled Ceilings

In big spaces, angled ceilings gift the room with an illusion of more overhead space. In smaller rooms, like attics or lofts, they create a cosy, rustic feel. Although sloped ceilings make a great statement in either space, you will need to do some research before you install a ceiling fan in a room that has one. The steeper the ceiling is, the harder it will be to find a ceiling fan to suit it. Some ceiling fans, like hugger style models are only compatible with flat ceilings, so it’s very important to find your rake before you fall in love with a style that won't work. 

Installing a ceiling fan on an angled ceiling is certainly possible, but it needs to be the right fan, with the right canopy. Many fans have a ball joint in their canopy, which allows the canopy to tilt. Knowing that a fan has a ball joint canopy isn't enough though, because some canopies tilt further than others. If your ceiling has a slope, make sure that you check the individual product listings on our site to see how much of an angle the fan can tolerate. 

How to calculate the angle of your ceiling

We've put together an easy table to help you work out how steep your ceiling is. We've done the hard work of calculating the angles, but before you can use the table, you will need to know your ceiling's rise and run. If you're not familiar with these terms, don't worry! Just follow the steps below, and you'll be ready to use the table. 

You will need:

  • Measuring tape
  • Ladder
  • A friend
  • The table at the bottom of this page

Step 1: Ask your friend to help you measure the ceiling height at its highest point of the slope you'd like to install your fan on. Make a note of the height, and call it Point A.  

Step 2: Measure the ceiling height at its lowest point, this is Point B.

Step 3:  To find the "Rise" we mentioned earlier, Subtract Point B from Point A. Once you have the answer find the corresponding number on the top row of our Ceiling Rake Calulator Table below.  

Step 4: Measure the horizontal distance between Point A and Point B. This is called the "Run"

 Step 5: Use the table below to find your ceiling angle. If your ceiling rake exceeds 44 degrees, we don't carry any suitable products for your ceiling at present. You may need to consider a wall fanor pedestal fan.              

←   Rise (metres) →







Run

(metres)

 

1

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

1

45°

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

26.5°

45°

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

18.5°

33.7°

45°

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

14.03°

26.56°

36.86°

45°

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

11.3°

 

21.80°

30.96°

38.6°

45°

 

 

 

 

 

6

9.46°

18.43°

26.56°

33.7°

39.80°

45°

 

 

 

 

7

8.13°

15.94°

23.2°

29.74°

35.53°

40.6°

45°

 

 

 

8

7.12°

14.03°

20.55°

26.56°

32.01°

36.87°

41.18°

45°

 

 

9

6.3°

12.52°

18.43°

23.96°

29.05°

33.69°

37.87°

41.63°

45°

 

10

5.71°

11.31°

16.7°

21.80°

26.56°

30.97°

34.99°

38.65°

41.98°

45°

How To Use Your Ceiling Angle To Find The Right  Fan

Most of  our suppliers publish their fans' maximum angle as a whole number. Because of this, in most cases you will need to round the angle up (eg. from 5.71 to 6) to find a compatible fan. 

Keep in mind that if you're adding a remote accessory to your fan, this may affect the maximum angle you can install the fan on. This is because the remote's receiver is designed to sit in the canopy. Once the receiver is placed inside the canopy, the canopy may not be able to tilt as far back. The maximum rake specification we publish on our listings is based on installation with the control the fan comes with by default. However, where possible we try to publish the maximum rake for both wall and remote control operation on our remote adaptable fans. This information isn't always available to us at the time of publication though, so if you can't find the specifications you need, please contact us